«Ginger Snaps» is the story of two sisters, two outcasts that are obsessed with death. Their main hobby is to play around with practical effects and a photo camera, taking pictures of themselves playing dead. The sisters face a serious threat when Ginger, the oldest of them, is getting bitten by a creature resembling a werewolf, on the night she has her first menstrual period. Soon, Ginger’s behaviour and appearance starts to change, and Brigitte, the youngest of the two sisters, must try and help Ginger. But is there really any way to stop what is happening to her?

This movie is just as much a werewolf movie as it is a coming of age movie. Ginger’s gradual transformation into a werewolf beast, changing from the young and “innocent” older sister that Brigitte is used to, could be seen as some kind of metaphor for the female coming-of-age experience shown through Ginger’s lycanthropic transformation. This makes the movie one of the most imaginative Werewolf films I have seen thus far.

«Ginger Snaps» became successful enough to warrant two sequels: «Ginger Snaps 2, Unleashed» from 2004, and «Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning», also from 2004. I have not seen any of these movies yet, and I personally think this first movie ended pretty well and with no need for any sequels.

Vanja and I went to see “It” on friday, directed by Andy Muschietti (previously known for the horror movie “Mama” ).

To be honest, I was a little sceptical to this movie at first. When I saw one of the first pictures from the movie, with Bill Skarsgård as Pennywise, I couldn’t help but thinking “yikes, he looks like a character from Looney Tunes”! (Probably because of those big buck teeth). And I suspected it would end up being way too cheesy and that Bill would not live up to Tim Curry’s previous performance as Pennywise in “It” from 1990.

I am happy to have been totally wrong, though.

Bill Skarsgård’s performance as Pennywise well exceeded my expectations. He was just the right amount of cheesy (he/it is a clown, after all) and right amount of creepy, in order to set the right atmosphere. Instead of trying to copy Tim Curry’s famous version of the character, Bill did his own thing. Just like Heath Ledger did with The Joker.

Now, as for the movie itself, I really enjoyed the “Goonies”-vibes in it, and the 80’s theme (one of the young actors are also from “Stranger Things” , a series I also really liked that had a strong 80’s feel to it).

While I have seen the 1990’s version, I haven’t read the book, so I can make no comparison between them. But like the 1990s version it comes in two parts, and I’m looking forward to the second part.